Translator’s Notes:

Please do NOT repost or retranslate this script without permission. I ask firstly because I put an enormous amount of work into it, and secondly because it isn’t perfect and translating it again will just introduce more mistakes. :)

 

This work is largely based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet, with some changes in sentence order and some cuts to fit the two-hour format of the musical. I’m afraid that plays havoc with the meter and rhyme. I went back through and marked the sections that were completely original, but I may have missed some.

 

Hamlet!!

By Fujī Daisuke

Based on the original by William Shakespeare.

Source: A New Translation - Hamlet translated by Kawai Shōichirō

(Kadokawa Shoten Publishing).

 

RYŪ

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for coming today. This is Moon Troupe’s Ryū Masaki. We will now begin the two act Rock Opera “Hamlet!!”, written and directed by Fujii Daisuke, based on the work by William Shakespeare.

 

Act I

 

Introduction: Restless Spirits

 

[Enter Ghosts]

 

GHOST (HORATIO)

When yond same star that's westward from the pole
begins to illume that part of heaven—

To-night is the anniversary of Prince Hamlet’s death.

Since that sublime soul darkened

How many times have I relived that night?

 

I know, I know! I’ll tell the tale until it’s finished.

I can never rest in peace. For the sake of quieting your sorrows!

His tale-! The truth of what he was-!

Sister, sing a requiem for the legendary prince!

 

Requiem

GHOST (CELIA)
Ahhh~

GHOST (HORATIO)
You gave up your life to carry out
justice through revenge
The staring role of your brief and beautiful life--
What did you think of it?


GHOST (CELIA)
Ahhh~

GHOST (HORATIO)
Beloved one,
What do you see now in the Land of the Dead?
As a spirit that seethes with boiling and burning emotion
The crimson sunrise stretches,
Advancing up the eastern face of the hills


Let's gather the principals of the legend
In order to praise your spirit


GHOST CHORUS
Legend of Hamlet! Legend of Hamlet!
Hamlet… Hamlet... Hamlet... Hamlet...

 

 

Prologue: Resurrection

 

[Enter Hamlet]

 

SPIRIT (HAMLET): I am… Hamlet!

 

To Be Or Not To Be

To be, or not to be
To be, or not to be

To be, or not to be
That is the question

Life, or death:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them?

To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd.

To be, or not to be
To die, to sleep, to sleep, to sleep
And, perchance,
to dream!

 

[Enter Ophelia]

Honest, beautiful soul
Spring fairy floating on the water's surface
The one I love is
the beautiful Ophelia

(To be, or not to be
To be, or not to be)

The only one I want
Is that dazzlingly beautiful soul
It's called Love! (Love!) Love! (Love!) Love! (Love!)


(To be, or not to be
To be, or not to be)


Let us put on a performance once again this eve
I am the protagonist of this tragedy
Smeared with the blood of hate and revenge
I am... Hamlet!


(Hamlet, oh, Hamlet!)

For the sake of love!
To be, or not to be!

(Oh, Hamlet!
To be, or not to be!)

Ahhhh, ahhhhhhh!

 

HORATIO

Let us turn back the sands of time—

To the beginning of the hatred and revenge.

It all began on that day, with that abominable event!

 

Scene 1 – A Sudden Occurrence

 

The New King (Ode to Denmark)

CHORUS
Ah, our Denmark
Wrapped in blue seas and greenery
A beautiful land, our Denmark!


CITIZEN
The king of Denmark has passed away
Already two months have gone, and now the sun rises
Chasing away the clouds
Burying sorrows in the earth


CHORUS
The sun of Denmark
The light of Elsinore
Sun, you are our king
Claudius, Claudius!


CHRISTOPHER
Ah, you are the new king.

HAMLET
[Aside] Something is wrong...

CLAUDIUS
Our brother, king of Denmark
Passed away suddenly
It is proper for us all to indulge our sorrow in lamentations
But we must not forget ourselves in excess
We must protect our homeland
Our beloved Denmark!


CHORUS
YOU are the savior of Denmark!
You've brought us life again!
Our sun, Lord Claudius!


CHORUS
The sun of Denmark
The light of Elsinore
Sun, you are our king
Claudius, Claudius!


HAMLET
[Aside] Is there no discretion in this land?

CLAUDIUS
Beautiful sister, Gertrude
Wipe away your tears of grief
I want you to be my right arm
To help me protect this land,
Please take my hand as my wife


CHORUS
The queen will be his wife!

HAMLET
[Aside] Such love should not be, where sorrow is sunk into joy!

CLAUDIUS
Play on a merry tune for a funeral
And a dirge for a marriage!


CHORUS

The sun of Denmark
The light of Elsinore
Sun, you are our king
Claudius, Claudius
Claudius!

 

CHRISTOPHER

The coronation of the new king of Denmark,

And the engagement to Queen Gertrude,

Have now been witnessed here in Elsinore!

 

?

Cheers for the king!

 

ALL

Cheers!

 

?

Cheers for Denmark!

 

ALL

Cheers!

 

LAERTES

My lord!

 

CLAUDIUS

Laertes, what is it?

What wouldst thou beg, Laertes,
That shall not be my offer, not thy asking?
The head is not more native to the heart,
The hand more instrumental to the mouth,
Than is the throne of Denmark to thy father.
What wouldst thou have, Laertes?

 

LAERTES

My dread lord,
Your leave and favour to return to France.
Your gracious leave and pardon!

 

CLAUDIUS

Have you your father's leave? What says Polonius?

 

POLONIUS

He hath, my lord,

I do beseech you, give him leave to go.

 

CLAUDIUS

Take thy fair hour, Laertes; time be thine,
And thy best graces spend it at thy will!

 

LAERTES

Yes, my lord! Thank you!

 

CLAUDIUS

But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son,--

HAMLET

[Aside] A little more than kin, and less than kind.

CLAUDIUS

How is it that the clouds still hang on you?

 

Gertrude:

Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off,
And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark.
Do not for ever with thy vailed lids
Seek for thy noble father in the dust:
Thou know'st 'tis common; all that lives must die.

 

HAMLET

Ay, madam, it is common.

 

GERTRUDE

If it be,
Why seems it so particular with thee?

 

HAMLET

Seems, madam! nay it is!

 

In Mourning Dress

HAMLET
'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
Nor customary suits of solemn black,
Nor windy suspiration of forced breath,
No, nor the fruitful river in the eye,
That can denote me truly

But I have that within which passeth show;
These but the trappings and the suits of woe.

CLAUDIUS

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet,
To give these mourning duties to your father:
However-

We pray you, throw to earth
This unprevailing woe, and think of us
As of a father
And with no less nobility of love
Than that which dearest father bears his son,
Do I impart toward you.

 

And we beseech you, to be
Here, in the cheer and comfort of our eye,
Our chiefest courtier, and our son.

 

GERTRUDE

Let not thy mother lose her prayers, Hamlet.

 

HAMLET

I shall in all my best obey you, madam.

CLAUDIUS 
Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply:
Be as ourself in Denmark. Madam, come;
This gentle and unforced accord of Hamlet
Sits smiling to my heart.

The great cannon to the clouds shall tell,
And the king's rouse the heavens all bruit again,
Re-speaking earthly thunder.

 

CHORUS

The sun of Denmark
The light of Elsinore
Sun, you are our king
Claudius, Claudius!

 

[Exit all except Hamlet]

 

HAMLET

O, that this too too solid flesh would melt
Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!

O God! How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable,
Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Ah fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,
That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature
Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

But two months dead: nay, not so much, not two:
So excellent a king; that was, to this,
Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother
That he might not beteem the winds of heaven
Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

Why, she would hang on him,
As if increase of appetite had grown
By what it fed on.
Let me not think on't—Frailty, thy name is woman!—

O, God! a beast, that wants discourse of reason,
Would have mourn'd longer--married with my uncle,
My father's brother, but no more like my father
Than I to Hercules.

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears
Had left the flushing in her galled eyes—

 

[Enter Horatio and Celia]

 

HORATIO

Hail to your lordship!

 

HAMLET

Horatio!

 

HORATIO

The same, my lord, and your poor servant ever.

HAMLET

Sir, my good friend; I'll change that name with you.

 

CELIA

Hail to your lordship!

 

HAMLET

Ah, your sister is with you!

I am glad to see you well.

But what is your affair in Elsinore?
We'll teach you to drink deep ere you depart.

 

CELIA

My lord, we came to see your father's funeral.

HAMLET
I pray thee, do not mock me, friends;
I think it was to see my mother's wedding.

 

HORATIO

Indeed, my lord, it follow'd hard upon.

 

HAMLET

Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven
Or ever I had seen that day, Horatio!
My father!—methinks I see my father.

 

HORATIO

Where, my lord?

HAMLET
In my mind's eye, Horatio.

HORATIO 
I saw him once; he was a goodly king.

HAMLET
He was a man, take him for all in all,
I shall not look upon his like again.

 

HORATIO

In truth, I think I saw him yesternight.

 

HAMLET

Who?

 

HORATIO

My lord, the king your father.

HAMLET
The king my father!

HORATIO
Season your admiration for awhile.

 

Horatio's Confession

HORATIO
In the middle of the night when my mind had become still as death
I saw it two nights in a row.
A form entirely like your honored father
With a stern visage and a solemn gait
Exposed to the night air, he passed majestically


CELIA
My brother secretly confided in me
On the third night I saw it too
The ghost


HAMLET
Where was this?

CELIA
Upon the castle wall.

HAMLET
Did you not speak to it?

HORATIO
My lord, I did;
But answer made it none: yet once methought
It lifted up its head and did address
Itself to motion, like as it would speak;
But even then the morning cock crew loud.

It shrunk in haste away,
And vanish'd from our sight.


HAMLET
'Tis very strange.

HORATIO
As I do live, my honour'd lord, 'tis true;
And we did think it writ down in our duty
To let you know of it.

HAMLET
Indeed, but this troubles me. Horatio-

I will also go tonight

HORATIO
My lord!

HAMLET
If it assume my noble father's person,
I'll speak to it, though hell itself should gape
And bid me hold my peace.

I pray you all,
If you have hitherto conceal'd this sight,
Let it be tenable in your silence still;
And whatsoever else shall hap to-night,
Give it an understanding, but no tongue.


Upon the castle wall, 'twixt eleven and twelve.

HORATIO
Our duty to your honour.

HAMLET
Your loves, as mine to you: farewell.
My father's spirit! all is not well;
I doubt some foul play.

Would the night were come!
Till then sit still, my soul: foul deeds will rise,
Though all the earth o'erwhelm them, to men's eyes.

 

 

Scene 2 – Hope

 

OPHELIA

There are many kinds of flowers

Shall I teach you? The meanings of the flowers?

There's rosemary, that's for remembrance;

Pray, love, remember.

 

Brother!

 

LAERTES

Ophelia!

 

OPHELIA

You’re returning to France now, aren’t you?

 

LAERTES

It’s time to say farewell.

And, sister, as the winds give benefit
And convoy is assistant, do not sleep,
But let me hear from you.

 

OPHELIA

Do you doubt that?

 

LAERTES

As for Hamlet and the trifling of his favour,
Hold it a fashion and a toy in blood,
A violet in the youth of primy nature,
The perfume and suppliance of a minute; No more.

 

OPHELIA

No more but so?

 

LAERTES

Think it no more!

 

Fear Prince Hamlet!

For he himself is subject to his birth:
He may not, as unvalued persons do,
Carve for himself; for on his choice depends
The safety and health of this whole state

 

OPHELIA

Brother—

 

LAERTES

Fear it, Ophelia!

Then weigh what loss your honour may sustain,
If you lose your heart, or your chaste treasure open
To his unmaster'd importunity.

 

Fear it, Ophelia!

If pricked by a thorn;

A rose in the spring will never bloom.

 

OPHELIA

I shall the effect of this good lesson keep,
As watchman to my heart.

 

CHORUS

Ophelia

 

OPHELIA

But, good my brother,
Do not show me the steep and thorny way to heaven;
Whiles, like a puff'd and reckless libertine,
Reck not thy own rede.

 

LAERTES

O, fear me not. … Ah, father!

 

POLONIUS

Yet here, Laertes! aboard, aboard, for shame!
The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail,
And you are stay'd for. There; my blessing with thee!

 

LAERTES

Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord.

POLONIUS 
Go; your servants tend.

 

LAERTES

Farewell, Ophelia; and remember well
What I have said to you.

OPHELIA
'Tis in my memory lock'd,
And you yourself shall keep the key of it.

LAERTES
Farewell.

 

POLONIUS

What is't, Ophelia, be hath said to you?

OPHELIA
So please you, something touching the Lord Hamlet.

 

POLONIUS

'Tis told me, he hath very oft of late
Given private time to you; and you yourself
Have of your audience been most free and bounteous.

 

OPHELIA

Father!

 

POLONIUS
As it behoves my daughter and your honour.
What is between you? give me up the truth.

 

OPHELIA

He hath, my lord, made tenders
Of his affection to me.

 

POLONIUS

Affection! pooh! you speak like a green girl.

 

OPHELIA

But, my lord, he hath importuned me with love
In honourable fashion.

 

POLONIUS

Ay, fashion you may call it; go to, go to.

OPHELIA
And hath given countenance to his speech, my lord,
With almost all the holy vows of heaven.

 

POLONIUS

Do not believe his vows!

Men in his position simply use them

To trick dizzy girls into unholy suits!

I would not, in plain terms, Ophelia, from this time forth,
Have you so slander any moment leisure,
As to give words or talk with the Lord Hamlet.

 

OPHELIA

I shall obey, my lord.

 

 

Scene 3 – Implacability

 

HAMLET

The air bites shrewdly.

HORATIO
It is a nipping cold.

 

HAMLET

What hour now?

 

HORATIO

I think it lacks of twelve.

CELIA
No, it is struck.

HORATIO
Indeed? Then it draws near the season
Wherein the spirit held his wont to walk.

 

[Noise of ordinance fired]

 

HORATIO

What does this mean, my lord?

HAMLET 
The king doth keep wassail,

And the swaggering up-spring reels;
And, as he drains his draughts of Rhenish down,
The kettle-drum thus brays out
The triumph of his pledge.

 

HORATIO

Is it a custom?

HAMLET
Ay, marry, is't:
But to my mind, though I am native here
And to the manner born, it is a custom
More honour'd in the breach than the observance.

 

HORATIO

Look, my lord, it comes!

[Enter Ghost]

HAMLET
Angels and ministers of grace defend us!
Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd,
Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell,
Be thy intents wicked or charitable,
Thou comest in such a questionable shape.

That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet,
King, father, royal Dane: O, answer me!
Let me not burst in ignorance; but tell
Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death,
Have burst their cerements?

Say, why is this? wherefore? what should we do?

 

HORATIO

It beckons you to go away with it,
As if it some impartment did desire
To you alone.

CELIA
But do not go with it. My lord, do not!

 

HAMLET

It will not speak; then I will follow it.

HORATIO
Do not, my lord.

HAMLET
Why, what should be the fear?

I do not set my life in a pin's fee.

 

It waves me forth again: I'll follow it.

 

HORATIO

What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord,

Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff
That beetles o'er his base into the sea,
Which might deprive your sovereignty of reason
And draw you into madness?

 

HAMLET

It waves me still.

HORATIO
You shall not go, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Hold off your hands.

My fate cries out,
And makes each petty artery in this body—

 

I say, away! Go on; I'll follow thee.

 

HORATIO

My lord!

 

CELIA

Prince Hamlet!

 

CHORUS

That thou, dead corse,

Again revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon,
Making night hideous; and we fools of nature
So horridly to shake our disposition

 

HAMLET

Where wilt thou lead me? I'll go no further.

 

GHOST

Mark me.

 

HAMLET

I will.

 

GHOST

Lend thy serious hearing
To what I shall unfold.

 

HAMLET

Speak; I am bound to hear.

 

Ghost

So art thou to revenge, when thou shalt hear.

 

HAMLET

Revenge?

 

The Late King’s Confession

GHOST
I am thy father's spirit,
Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night,
And for the day confined to fast in fires,
Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature
Are burnt and purged away.


HAMLET
Alas, how pitiful!

GHOST
Mark me, Hamlet!
If thou didst ever thy dear father love—


HAMLET
O God!

GHOST
Revenge his foul
And most unnatural murder


HAMLET
Murder?

GHOST
There is no murderer more cruel or cowardly!

HAMLET
Haste me to know't, that I, with wings as swift
As meditation or the thoughts of love,
May sweep to my revenge.


GHOST
I look forward to it! Listen well
While I did sleep within my orchard,
My custom always of the afternoon,
Poison was poured into my ear
Turbulent poison within a vial
Swift as quicksilver it courses
Through the body
In an instant curdling the blood


HAMLET
What inhumanity!

GHOST
The serpent that did sting thy father's life-!

 

HAMLET
(The serpent!)

GHOST
Is now-!

 

HAMLET
(Is now!)

GHOST
As if it is natural-!

 

HAMLET
(As if it is natural-!)

GHOST
Crowned king!


HAMLET
O my prophetic soul!

GHOST
That the beast shall even go so far as the queen
Won to his shameful lust
Luring her from I, whose love was dignified


HAMLET
Mother!

GHOST
But, Hamlet! Contrive against thy mother naught
Leave her to her own self torture!


HAMLET
Father!

GHOST
Life, crown, and wife were snatched from me
By my brother's hand


[Rooster crows]

GHOST
I must away. The scorching tortures of Hell await.

HAMLET
Father!

GHOST
Fare thee well, Hamlet. Do not forget thy father!

 

[Exit Ghost]

 

Decision

HAMLET
Hold, hold, my heart;
And you, my sinews, grow not instant old,
But bear me stiffly up. Remember thee!
Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seat
In this distracted globe. Remember thee!

How could I forget?
And thy commandment all alone shall live
Within this trembling heart
I swear I will have revenge:

Upon that smiling, damned villain!

GHOST
(Swear!)

HAMLET
Has judgment on this earth gone astray?
Was I born simply
To correct this loss?


GHOST
(Swear!)

HAMLET
Rest, rest, perturbed spirit!
I swear now I will have revenge.

So! Now is the time!
I will begin to enact! Madness!
My behavior will deceive all men

Am I up to this task?
No, I must!
I cannot drop this act
Not even before Ophelia, whom I love...

 

[Ophelia enters. Hamlet hands her a letter and exits]

 

OPHELIA

[Reads] ‘'O dear Ophelia, I am ill at these numbers;
I have not art to reckon my groans: but that
I love thee best, O most best, believe it.
'Thine evermore most dear lady, whilst
this machine is to him, HAMLET.

 

The frightening thing is that
I don't understand him—His feelings
His pitiful countenance, like one come forth from Hell
But, his embrace was certainly warm
Our hearts could echo each other
I love him, that man
That near yet far man


I'm sorry, Father!

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

In youth, when I did love, did love,
Methought it was very sweet,
To contract, O, the time, for, ah, my behove,
O, methought, there was nothing meet.

 

 

Scene 4 – True to Life

 

TRESTLES

My lord, and my lady, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are come.

 

CLAUDIUS

Welcome, dear Rosencrantz and Guildenstern!
The need we have to use you did provoke
Our hasty sending. Something have you heard
Of Hamlet's transformation?

Sith nor the exterior nor the inward man
Resembles that it was. What it should be,
More than his father's death, that thus hath put him
So much from the understanding of himself,
I cannot dream of: I entreat you both,
Being of so young days brought up with him.

 

GERTRUDE
And sure I am two men there are not living
To whom he more adheres.

I entreat you both,
That you vouchsafe your rest here in our court
Some little time: so by your companies
To draw him on to pleasures.

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Both your majesties
Might put your dread pleasures more into command
Than to entreaty.

 

GUILDENSTERN

But we both obey, in the full bent
To lay our service freely at your feet,
To be commanded.

 

CLAUDIUS

Thanks, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

 

GUILDENSTERN

Heavens make our presence and our practises
Pleasant and helpful to him!

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Ay, amen!

 

LORD POLONIUS

My good lord,
I am joyfully return'd.

 

KING CLAUDIUS

Polonius, thou still hast been the father of good news.

Do pass it on.

 

POLONIUS

Yes, my lord. I have found
The very cause of Hamlet's lunacy.

 

CLAUDIUS

He tells me, my dear, he hath found
The head and source of all your son's distemper.

 

GERTRUDE

I doubt it is no other but the main;
His father's death, and our o'erhasty marriage.

 

KING CLAUDIUS

Well, we shall sift him.

 

POLONIUS

I shall tell you with great care.

I have a daughter

 

MAIDS

(Ophelia, Ophelia)

 

POLONIUS

Who, hath given me this

 

MAIDS

(A love letter, ohh, ohh!)

 

TRESTLES

‘To the celestial and my soul's idol—’

 

BARCLAY

‘—the most beautified Ophelia:’

 

GERTRUDE

Came this from Hamlet to her?

 

POLONIUS

Yes, good madam.

 

PHEBE

‘Never doubt—’

 

AUDREY

‘—my burning love.

 

POLONIUS

‘I love thee best.
'Thine evermore most.’

 

CLAUDIUS

But how hath she
Received his love?

 

LORD POLONIUS

What do you think of me?

 

CLAUDIUS

As of a man faithful and honourable.

 

POLONIUS

I would fain prove so.

 

And my young mistress thus I did bespeak:
'Lord Hamlet is a prince, out of thy star;
This must not be:' and then I precepts gave her,
That she receive no tokens.

 

MAIDS

(Ophelia!)

 

POLONIUS

Which done, she took the fruits of my advice;
And he, repulsed

 

Fell into a fast, thence into a weakness,

Thence to a lightness,

And, thus into seeming madness.

Love-sick Lord Hamlet!

 

POLONIUS/MAIDS

Love-sick Lord Hamlet!

 

POLONIUS

This way….

 

 

CRAZY HAMLET

 

HAMLET (CHORUS)
Hey!
(Hey!)
Are you ready?
(Woo!)
I am crazy Hamlet!
This world is a prison,
Denmark being one o' the worst

Confines, wards and dungeons

Your ambition makes it one; you'll be bound!
A king of infinite space,
I could be bounded in a nut shell

BYE-BYE!

BYE-BYE! x3

Look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament
This most excellent canopy, the air
Nothing more than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours
What a piece of work is a man!
The beauty of the world!
Nothing more than this quintessence of dust

CHORUS
Poor black bird,
bound in a prison
CRAZY HAMLET
CRAZY HAMLET

 

[Enter Polonius]

 

POLONIUS

How does my good Lord Hamlet?

 

HAMLET

Well, God-a-mercy.

 

POLONIUS

Do you know me, my lord?

 

HAMLET

Excellent well; you are a fishmonger.

 

POLONIUS

Not I, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Then I would you were so honest a man.

 

POLONIUS

Honest, my lord!

 

HAMLET

Ay, sir; to be honest, as this world goes, is to be
one man picked out of ten thousand.

 

POLONIUS

That's very true, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Have you a daughter?

 

POLONIUS

I have, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Let her not walk i' the sun: conception is a
blessing: but not as your daughter may conceive.

POLONIUS

[Aside] How say you by that? Still harping on my
daughter: yet he said I was a fishmonger:

He is far gone, far gone.

 

My honourable lord,

I will most humbly take my leave of you.

 

HAMLET

You cannot, sir, take from me any thing that I will
more willingly part withal: except my life, except my life.

 

POLONIUS

Fare you well, my lord.

 

HAMLET

These tedious old fools!

 

[Exit Polonius]

 

CHORUS

CRAZY HAMLET!
CRAZY HAMLET!

 

[Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]

 

GUILDENSTERN

My honoured lord!

 

ROSENCRANTZ

My most dear lord!

 

HAMLET

My excellent good friends!
Guildenstern and Rosencrantz!

Good friends, how do ye both?

 

GUILDENSTERN

Happy, in that we are not over-happy;
On fortune's cap we are not the very button.

 

HAMLET

Nor the soles of her shoe?

 

Then you live about her waist, or in the middle of
her favours? What's the news?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

None, my lord, but that the world's grown honest.

 

HAMLET

Then is doomsday near. What have you,
my good friends, deserved at the hands of fortune,
that she sends you to prison hither?

 

GUILDENSTERN

Oh, Crazy—

 

ROZENCRANTZ

Oh, Crazy—

 

GUILDENSTERN

Prison, my lord?

 

ROZENCRANTZ

This wonderful land?

 

HAMLET

To me it is a prison.

 

GUILDENSTERN

'Tis too narrow for you, my lord.

 

ROZENCRANTZ

We come with condolences—

 

HAMLET

Too many have come; I tire of such talk!

In the beaten way of friendship,

What make you at Elsinore?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

To visit you, my lord; no other occasion.

 

HAMLET

Were you not sent for?

Come, deal justly with me:

There is a kind of confession in your looks.

The good king and queen have sent for you.

 

GUILDENSTERN

To what end, my lord?

 

HAMLET

But let me conjure you, by the rights of our fellowship,

By the obligation of our ever-preserved love

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Love?

 

HAMLET

Be even and direct with me,
Well?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

[Aside to GUILDENSTERN] What say you?

 

GUILDENSTERN

[Aside to ROSENCRANTZ] What shall we do?

 

HAMLET

Hold not off!

 

ROSENCRANTZ/GUILDENSTERN

My lord, we were sent for.

By the king and queen.

 

HAMLET

I have of late lost all my mirth.

The earth seems to me a sterile promontory.

Man delights not me:

No, nor woman—such as thee—neither

 

GUILDENSTERN

[Laughs]

 

HAMLET

Though by your smiling you seem to say so.

 

GUILDENSTERN

My lord, there was no such stuff in my thoughts.

 

HAMLET

Why did you laugh then?

 

GUILDENSTERN

To think, my lord, if you delight not in man, what
lenten entertainment the singers shall receive from
you.

 

ROSENCRANTZ

We coted them on the way; and hither are they
coming, to offer you song.

 

HAMLET

Warmly welcome! How well of you to remember my particular love for song!

 

ROSENCRANTZ

We thought it might provide fleeting amusement.

 

HAMLET

What players are they?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Even those you were wont to take delight in, the
singers of the Orient.

 

HAMLET

Friends, you are welcome to Elsinore. Your hands,
come then. But my uncle-father and aunt-mother are deceived.

 

GUILDENSTERN

In what, my dear lord?

 

HAMLET

I am but mad north-north-west: when the wind is
southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw.

 

FIRST PLAYER

Ah, at the end of a journey from far-away

We finally arrive at beautiful Elsinore

 

HAMLET

You are welcome, masters; welcome, all. O, my old
friend! thy face is valenced since I saw thee last:
comest thou to beard me in Denmark? What, my young
lady and mistress! By'r lady, your ladyship is
nearer to heaven than when I saw you last, by the
altitude of a chopine. Welcome. And, finally, Master:

Come, give us a taste of your quality; come, a passionate song.

 

TOUCHSTONE

What song, my lord?

 

HAMLET

Ah, Pyrrhus, Pyrrhus—
“The rugged Pyrrhus—”

it is not so:—it begins with Pyrrhus:

 

TOUCHSTONE

‘Anon he finds him
Striking too short at Greek

His antique sword,
Rebellious to his arm,

Lies where it falls,
Repugnant to command

Pyrrhus at Priam drives

The unnerved father falls,

Miserable Pyrrhus.

Aroused vengeance sets him new a-work;

Pyrrhus' bleeding sword
Now falls on Priam.

 

PLAYERS

‘Who had seen the mobled queen

Run barefoot up and down

With tongue in venom steep'd,
'Gainst Fortune's state would treason have
pronounced:

 

TOUCHSTONE

‘The instant burst of clamour that she made,

 

PLAYERS
‘Would have made milch the burning eyes of heaven,
And passion in the gods.

 

HAMLET

'Tis well: I have tears in mine eyes. Thank you.

I'll have thee speak out the rest soon.

 

Rozencrantz and Guildenstern,

will you see the singers well bestowed?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Come, sirs.

 

HAMLET

Ah, yes!

We'll ha't a ball to-night.

We’ll borrow your Eastern cloth,

And be entertained by your opera!

Convey it to the king and queen at once

 

ROZENCRANTZ

Yes, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Dost thou hear me, Master; do you know the
Murder of Gonzago?

 

TOUCHSTONE

Of course, my lord.

 

HAMLET

We'll ha't to-night. I have a song of some dozen lines;

Could you perform it for me?

 

TOUCHSTONE

Ay, my lord, anything you desire.

 

HAMLET

Very well.

 

Now I am alone.

 

Convincing Performance

HAMLET
This singer here,
But in a dream of passion,
Could force his soul so to his own conceit
That from her working all his visage wann'd,
Tears in his eyes, a broken voice.
And all for nothing!
Yet I,
A dull and muddy-mettled rascal, peak,
Like John-a-dreams.
Am I a coward?


What ho! Horatio!

HORATIO
Here, sweet lord, at your service.

HAMLET
There is an opera to-night before the king;
One scene of it comes near the circumstance
Which I have told thee of my father's death:
I prithee, when thou seest that act afoot,
Even with the very comment of thy soul
Observe mine uncle: if his occulted guilt
Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
It is a damned ghost that we have seen.

HORATIO
Well, my lord:
If he steal aught and 'scape detecting, I will pay the theft.

HAMLET
I must continue in my madness. I rely on thee.

HORATIO
My lord!

[Exit Horatio]


HAMLET
I desire certain proof;
To-night, without fail,

I'll catch the conscience of the king.

 

[Enter Polonius and Ophelia]

 

POLONIUS

Ophelia, walk you here.

Read on this book;
That show of such an exercise may colour
Your loneliness.

 

To-night, without fail,

I'll catch the conscience of the prince.

 

[Polonius hides, watching]

 

HAMLET

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? —Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.

 

OPHELIA

Good my lord,
How does your honour for this many a day?

 

HAMLET

I humbly thank you; well, well, well.

 

OPHELIA

My lord, I have remembrances of yours,
I pray you, now receive them.

 

HAMLET

No, not I;
I never gave you aught.

 

OPHELIA

My honour'd lord, you know right well you did;
And, with them, words of so sweet breath composed
Their perfume lost, take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.

 

HAMLET

Are you honest?

 

OPHELIA

My lord?

 

HAMLET

Are you fair?

 

OPHELIA

What means your lordship?

 

HAMLET

That if you be honest and fair, your honesty should
admit no discourse to your beauty.

 

Get Thee to a Nunnery!

OPHELIA
Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than
with honesty?

HAMLET
Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
force of honesty can translate beauty into his
likeness.


Ophelia, I did love you once.

OPHELIA
Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

HAMLET
You should not believe me;
I loved you not.


OPHELIA
I was the more deceived.

HAMLET
Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a
breeder of sinners? I am very
proud, revengeful, ambitious.
We are arrant knaves, all; believe none of us.
Go thy ways to a nunnery!


Where's your father?

OPHELIA
At home, my lord.

HAMLET
Let the doors be shut upon him, that he may play the
fool no where but in's own house.

OPHELIA
O, help him, you sweet heavens!

HAMLET
Get thee to a nunnery!
Or, if thou wilt needs marry, marry a fool;
For wise men know well enough
what monsters you make of them.
To a nunnery, go!


OPHELIA
O heavenly powers, restore him!

HAMLET
You jig, you amble, and you lisp, and nick-name God's creatures, and make your wantonness your ignorance. Go to, I'll no more on't; it hath made me mad. I say, we will have no more marriages.

To a nunnery, go!

 

[Exit Hamlet. Polonius and Claudius emerge from hiding]

 

OPHELIA

O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!

 

POLONIUS

Ophelia?

 

OPHELIA

I suck'd the honey of his music vows,
Now like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh.

That unmatch'd form and feature of blown youth
Blasted with ecstasy.

 

POLONIUS

Ophelia….

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet shall with speed to England.

It shall be so:
Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go.

 

MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGER)

But age, with his stealing steps,
Hath claw'd me in his clutch,

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)
And hath shipped me intil the land,
As if I had never been such.

 

HAMLET

To be, or not to be

To be, or not to be

 

To be, or not to be

That is the question

 

To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd.

 

To be, or not to be

To be, or not to be

To be, or not to be

 

Scene 5 – The Mind’s Eye

 

SINGING PRINCESS

This world is not for aye,

Nor love and fate unchanging.

So this eve, this eve alone

You shall perceive a true love.

 

Shall love change fortune?

Or fortune change love?

Thought provides no key:

All lock’d in Heaven’s heart.

 

Honest and fair women,

The testimony of it.

 

This world is not for aye,

Nor love and fate unchanging.

So this eve,

You shall perceive a true love.

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet, you seem in even temper.

 

HAMLET

Excellent, i' faith; of the chameleon's dish: I eat
the air.

 

CLAUDIUS

I have nothing with this answer.

 

HAMLET

My lord, you played once i' the university, you say?

 

POLONIUS

That did I, my lord; and was accounted a good actor.

 

HAMLET

What did you enact?

 

POLONIUS

I did enact Julius Caesar: I was killed i' the
Capitol; Brutus killed me.

 

HAMLET

It was a brute part of him to kill so capital a calf
there.

 

GERTRUDE

Come hither, my dear Hamlet, sit by me.

 

HAMLET

No, good mother, here's metal more attractive.

 

POLONIUS

[To CLAUDIUS] Do you mark that?

 

HAMLET

Lady, shall I lie in your lap?

 

OPHELIA

No, my lord.

 

HAMLET

I mean, my head upon your lap?

 

OPHELIA

Ay, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Do you think I meant country matters?

 

OPHELIA

No….

 

You are merry, my lord.

 

HAMLET

O God, your only jig-maker. What should a man do
but be merry? for, look you, how cheerfully my
mother looks, and my father died within these two hours.

 

OPHELIA

Nay, 'tis twice two months, my lord.

 

HAMLET

So long? O heavens! die two
months ago, and not forgotten yet?

 

TOUCHSTONE

For us, and for our tragedy,
Here stooping to your clemency,
We beg your hearing patiently.

 

HAMLET

Is this a prologue, or the posy of a ring?

 

OPHELIA

'Tis brief, my lord.

 

HAMLET

As woman's love.

 

GONZAGO

Full thirty times hath Phoebus' cart gone round,
Since love our hearts and Hymen did our hands
Unite commutual in most sacred bands.

 

GONZAGO’S WIFE

So many journeys may the sun and moon
Make us again count o'er ere love be done!
But, woe is me, you are so sick of late.

 

GONZAGO

'Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too;
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind;

And haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou—

 

GONZAGO’S WIFE

Such love must needs be treason in my breast.

 

GONZAGO

This world is not for aye,

Nor love and fate unchanging.

 

GONZAGO/GONZAGO’S WIFE

Shall love change fortune?

Or fortune change love?

 

GONZAGO

So long as the heart stays true

 

GONZAGO’S WIFE

Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife,
If, once a widow, ever I be wife!

 

GONZAGO

'Tis deeply sworn.

 

My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile
The tedious day with sleep.

 

HAMLET

Madam, how like you this opera?

 

GERTRUDE

The lady protests too much, methinks.

 

HAMLET

O, but she'll keep her word.

 

This is one Lucianus, nephew to the king.

 

LUCIANUS

Thoughts black, hands apt, drugs fit, and time agreeing;

Confederate season, else no creature seeing;
Thou mixture rank,
Thy natural magic and dire property,
On wholesome life usurp immediately.

 

HAMLET

He poisons him i' the garden for's estate. His
name's Gonzago: the story is extant, and writ in
choice Italian: you shall see anon how the murderer
gets the love of Gonzago's wife.

 

OPHELIA

The king rises.

 

GERTRUDE

How fares my lord?

 

CLAUDIUS

Give o'er the play!

Give me some light!

 

POLONIUS

Lights, bring lights!

 

CLAUDIUS

Give o'er!

 

GERTRUDE

How fares my lord?

Follow him. Hamlet, in my room!

 

[All exit, save Hamlet and Horatio]

 

HAMLET

O good Horatio, I'll take the ghost's word for a
thousand pound. Didst perceive?

 

HORATIO

Very well, my lord.

 

HAMLET

Upon the talk of the poisoning?

 

HORATIO

I did very well note him.

 

HAMLET
For if the king like not the comedy,
Why then, belike, he likes it not, perdy.

 

Tis now the very witching time of night

 

GHOST
When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
Contagion to this world

 

HAMLET

Now could I drink hot blood,
And do such bitter business as the day
Would quake to look on.

 

Act II

 

Scene 6 – Chaos

 

LUCIANUS

On wholesome life usurp immediately.

 

CLAUDIUS

Give o'er the play!

Give me some light!

 

POLONIUS

Lights, bring lights!

 

CLAUDIUS

Give o'er!

 

GERTRUDE

Follow him. Hamlet!

 

[All exit, save Hamlet]

 

HAMLET
For if the king like not the comedy,
Why then, belike, he likes it not, perdy.

 

[Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]

 

GUILDENSTERN

Good my lord, vouchsafe me a word with you.

 

HAMLET

Sir, a whole history.

 

GUILDENSTERN

The queen, your mother, in most great affliction of
spirit, hath sent me to you.

 

HAMLET

You are welcome.

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Then thus she says; your behavior hath struck her
into amazement and admiration.

 

HAMLET

O wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother!

 

ROSENCRANTZ

She desires to speak with you in her closet, ere you
go to bed.

 

HAMLET

We shall obey. Have you any further trade with us?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

My lord, you once did love me.

 

HAMLET

So I do still.

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? you
do, surely, freeze your heart, if
you deny your griefs to your friend.

 

In our youth did we play together, laugh together,

Together—

We talked together of all things

Alone without illumination

Were my hidden feelings

 

Please, my lord, entrust your burdens to us.

 

HAMLET

I shall tell you, Rozencrantz—

After I’ve climbed to the throne!

 

[Exit Hamlet]

 

ROSENCRANTZ

You can’t intend—! My lord!

 

Scene 7 – Repentance

 

CLAUDIUS

I like him not, nor stands it safe with us
To let his madness range. Therefore prepare you;
I your commission will forthwith dispatch,
And he to England shall along with you:

Arm you, I pray you, to this speedy voyage;
For we will fetters put upon this fear.

 

ROSENCRANTZ/GUILDENSTERN

We will haste us.

 

[Exit Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]

 

POLONIUS

My lord, he's going to his mother's closet:
Behind the arras I'll convey myself,
To hear the process.

 

CLAUDIUS

Thanks, dear my lord.

 

[Exit Polonius]

 

O, my offence is rank it smells to heaven.

 

Pray can I not,
Though inclination be as sharp as will:
My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent

What if this cursed hand
Were thicker than itself with brother's blood,
Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens
To wash it?

 

But, O, what form of prayer
Can serve my turn? since I am still possess'd
Of those effects for which I did the murder

 

My crown, mine own ambition and my queen.

 

[Enter Hamlet]

 

HAMLET

Now might I do it pat, now he is praying;
And now I'll do't. —Wait!

To take him in the purging of his soul,
When he is fit and season'd for his passage?
O, this is not revenge.

He took my father grossly, full of bread;
With all his crimes broad blown.

And how his audit stands who knows save heaven?

Up, sword; and know thou a more horrid hent:
When he is drunk asleep,

Or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed;
Or about some act that has no relish of salvation in't.

Then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven!

 

[Exit Hamlet]

 

CLAUDIUS

Try what repentance can: what can it not?
But, wretched state! O bosom black as death!

Help, angels!

 

My words fly up, my thoughts remain below

 

Scene 8 – Dread

 

POLONIUS

He will come straight.
Pray you, be round with him.

 

HAMLET

[Within] Mother, mother!

 

GERTRUDE

I'll warrant you,
Hide, I hear him coming.

 

[Polonius hides]

 

HAMLET

Mother, you called?

 

GERTRUDE

Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended.

 

HAMLET

Mother, you have my father much offended.

 

GERTRUDE

You answer with an idle tongue.

 

HAMLET

You question with a wicked tongue.

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Why, how now, Hamlet!

 

HAMLET

What's the matter now?

 

GERTRUDE

Have you forgot me?

 

HAMLET

No, not so:
You are the queen, your husband's brother's wife;
And--would it were not so!--you are my mother.

 

GERTRUDE

Nay, then, I'll set those to you that can speak.

 

HAMLET

Sit you down; you shall not budge;
You go not till I set you up a glass
Where you may see the inmost part of you.

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

What wilt thou do? thou wilt not murder me?
Help, help, ho!

 

POLONIUS

[Behind] What, ho! help, help, help!

 

HAMLET

[Drawing] How now! a rat? Dead, for a ducat, dead!

 

[Hamlet stabs Polonius]

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

O me, what hast thou done?

 

HAMLET

Nay, I know not:
Is it the king?

 

[Hamlet cuts the hanging. Polonius falls dead]

 

GERTRUDE

O, what a rash and bloody deed is this!

 

HAMLET

A bloody deed! almost as bad,

As kill a king, and marry with his brother.

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

As kill a king!

 

HAMLET

Let me wring your heart; for so I shall,
If it be made of penetrable stuff,
If damned custom have not brass'd it so
That it is proof and bulwark against sense.

 

GERTRUDE

What have I done?

 

HAMLET

Such an act
That takes off the rose
From the fair forehead of an innocent love
And sets a blister there.

You make marriage-vows
As false as dicers' oaths.

A licentious woman’s love:

Heaven's face doth glow

 

CHORUS

Ah, ah, licentious

Ah, ah, licentious

 

GERTRUDE

Ay me, what act?

 

HAMLET

At your age
The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble,
And waits upon the judgment

 

O shame! where is thy blush?

What devil was't
That thus hath cozen'd you at hoodman-blind?

 

CHORUS

Ah, ah, licentious

Ah, ah, licentious

 

GERTRUDE

O Hamlet, speak no more:

These words, like daggers, enter in mine ears.

 

HAMLET

Thy lord is a murderer and a villain;

That your precious diadem stole,
With welcome!

A king of shreds and patches,--

 

CHORUS

Ah, ah, licentious

Ah, ah, licentious

Licentious, licentious

Licentious woman

 

[Enter Ghost]

 

GHOST

Hamlet!

 

HAMLET

Save me, and hover o'er me with your wings,
You heavenly guards!

 

GERTRUDE

Alas, he's mad!

 

HAMLET

What would your gracious figure?

Do you not come your tardy son to chide?

 

Ghost

This visitation
Is but to whet thy almost blunted purpose.
But, look, step between thy mother and her fighting soul:
Speak to her, Hamlet.

 

HAMLET

How is it with you, lady?

 

GERTRUDE

O gentle son,
Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper
Sprinkle cool patience. Whereon do you look?

 

HAMLET

On him, on him! Look you, how pale he glares!
Do not look upon me with such sorrow.

 

GERTRUDE

To whom do you speak this?

 

HAMLET

Do you see nothing there?

 

GERTRUDE

Nothing at all.

 

HAMLET

Nor did you nothing hear?

 

GERTRUDE

No, nothing but ourselves.

 

HAMLET

Look, how it steals away!
My father

[Exit Ghost]

QUEEN GERTRUDE

This the very coinage of your brain:
This bodiless creation ecstasy
Is very cunning in.

 

HAMLET

Ecstasy!

Perturbation of the soul.

Check my pulse. For love of grace,
Lay not that mattering unction to your soul,
That not your trespass, but my madness speaks.

Confess yourself to heaven;
Repent what's past; avoid what is to come.

 

GERTRUDE

O Hamlet, thou hast cleft my heart in twain.

 

HAMLET

O, throw away the worser part of it,
And live the purer with the other half.

Good night: but go not to mine uncle's bed;

Assume a virtue, if you have it not.

 

GERTRUDE

What shall I do?

 

HAMLET

Indeed this counsellor
Is now most still, most secret and most grave,
Who was in life a foolish prating knave.

 

Good night, mother.

 

[Exit Hamlet. Enter Ophelia.]

 

OPHELIA

Pardon, madam. Ah—

Have you knowledge of my father?

 

[Exit Ophelia, screaming]

 

GERTRUDE

What? What has happened?

Is this a dream?

I would tear myself away from the nightmare

A dreadful night, and sleep so far away

Is this punishment met’d by Heaven?

 

My son speaks of my husband as a demon

Then is my soul chained to Hell?

My woman’s honour has been washed away in the dark

Yet I cannot stand my son’s hate

I love him

 

Frailty, thy name is…. woman!

 

Scene 9 – Conspiracy

 

ROSENCRANTZ

My lord!

 

CLAUDIUS

Rosencrantz, would he lend you an ear?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

No. On the matter of Polonius’ murder, my lord,
We cannot get aught from him.

 

CLAUDIUS

Where is he?

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Without, my lord; guarded, to know your pleasure.

 

CLAUDIUS

Bring him before us.

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Yes, my lord.

 

[Enter Hamlet and Guildenstern]

 

GUILDENSTERN

He is brought.

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet, For that which thou hast done,

This deed must send thee hence
With fiery quickness.

The bark is ready, and the wind at help,
The associates tend, and every thing is bent
For England.

 

HAMLET

Good.

 

KING CLAUDIUS

So is it, if thou knew'st our purposes.

 

HAMLET

I see a cherub that sees them. But, come; for
England! Farewell, dear mother.

 

CLAUDIUS

Thy loving father, Hamlet!

 

HAMLET

My mother: father and mother is man and wife; man
and wife is one flesh; and so, my mother. Come, for England!

 

[Exit Hamlet]

 

CLAUDIUS

Follow him at foot; tempt him with speed aboard;
Delay it not; I'll have him hence to-night:
Make haste!

 

ROSENCRANTZ/GUILDENSTERN

My lord!

 

[Exit Rozencrantz and Guildenstern]

 

Every thing is seal'd and done
That else leans on the affair.

 

Do it, England!

By letters congruing to that effect,
The present death of Hamlet.

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

A pick-axe, and a spade, a spade,

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)
For and a shrouding sheet:

 

MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGER)
O, a pit of clay for to be made

 

GRAVE-DIGGER
For such a guest is meet.

 

 

Scene 10 – Frenzy

 

GERTRUDE

I will not meet with her.

 

BARCLAY

Please, you must have an audience with her.

 

GERTRUDE

What would Ophelia have?

 

BARCLAY

She speaks much of her father; says she hears
There's tricks i' the world.

 

TRESTLES

Unfortunate soul, she seems to melt away.

 

GERTRUDE

In my heart, the calamities pile aloft.

The weak heart troubled by sin, fears.

 

[Enter Ophelia]

 

OPHELIA

There are many kinds of flowers

Shall I teach you? The meanings of the flowers?

 

Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark?

 

GERTRUDE

How now, Ophelia!

 

OPHELIA
How should I your true love know
From another one?
By his cockle hat and staff,
And his sandal shoon.

 

GERTRUDE

Alas, sweet lady, what imports this song?

 

OPHELIA

He is dead and gone, lady

 

GERTRUDE

Nay, but, Ophelia,—

 

OPHELIA

Nay, pray you, mark!


Bewept to the grave did I go
With true-love showers.

 

[Enter Claudius]

 

GERTRUDE

My lord!

 

CLAUDIUS

Ophelia!

 

OPHELIA

They say the owl was a baker's daughter.

The lord was deceived!

 

CLAUDIUS

How long hath she been thus?

 

OPHELIA

But I cannot choose but weep, to think they should lay him
i' the cold ground. My brother shall know of it.

 

CLAUDIUS

Conceit upon her father?

 

GERTRUDE

Ophelia!

 

OPHELIA

Come, my coach! Good night, sweet ladies;
good night!

 

[Exit Ophelia]

 

CLAUDIUS

Follow her close.

 

O, this is the poison of deep grief; it springs
All from her father's death. O Gertrude,

When sorrows come, they come not single spies
But in battalions. First, her father slain:
Next, your son gone.

Poor Ophelia
Divided from herself and her fair judgment

 

GERTRUDE

My lord—

Alack, what noise is this?

 

[Enter Laertes]

 

CLAUDIUS

The doors are broke!

 

LAERTES

Where is this king?

 

CLAUDIUS

Laertes!

 

LAERTES

There!

 

CLAUDIUS

Returned from France?

 

LAERTES

O thou vile king,
Give me my father!

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Calmly, good Laertes.

 

LAERTES

That drop of blood that's calm proclaims me bastard,
Cries cuckold to my father.

Where is my father?

 

CLAUDIUS

Dead.

 

GERTRUDE

But not by him.

 

LAERTES

How came he dead? I'll not be juggled with:
Vows, to the blackest devil!
I dare damnation. Only I'll be revenged
Most thoroughly for my father.

 

CLAUDIUS

Who shall stay you?

 

LAERTES

My will, not all the world:
And for my means,

They shall go far with little.

 

CLAUDIUS
You desire to know the certainty
Of your dear father's death?

 

LAERTES

None but his enemies.

To his good friends,

Repast them with my blood.

                                    

CLAUDIUS

Why, now you speak
Like a true gentleman.
I am guiltless of your father's death.

 

The true enemy who hast slain thy father is—

 

LAERTES

My enemy is?

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet!

 

[Enter Ophelia, screaming]

 

LAERTES

How now! what voice is that?

 

OPHELIA

Hamlet, Hamlet,

Farewell, beloved one

 

LAERTES

Hadst thou thy wits, and didst persuade revenge,
It could not move thus.

 

OPHELIA

They bore him barefaced on the bier;
Hey non nonny, hey non nonny

 

LAERTES

This nothing's more than matter.

 

OPHELIA

There's rosemary, that's for remembrance;

Pray, love, remember.

No matter how many years pass, remember! I shall not forget!

 

LAERTES

Ophelia!

 

OPHELIA

There's flattery of fennel for you, and false columbines:

There's rue for you—once called herb o' regret—

And here's some for me. I would give you
some violets, but they withered all when my father
died: they say he made a good end

 

LAERTES

Ah, rose of May:

Sweet sister—

Ophelia!

 

OPHELIA
And will he not come again?
He is gone,
And we cast away moan:

Go to thy death-bed.

 

God be wi' ye.

And of all Christian souls, I pray God.

God be wi' ye.

 

[Exit Ophelia]

 

LAERTES

Do you see this, O God?

 

CLAUDIUS

Laertes, I must commune with your grief.

Fair Ophelia’s change is laid at the door of one

Who has also injured me.

 

LAERTES

My lord.

 

CLAUDIUS

He which hath your noble father slain
Pursued my life.

 

LAERTES

Tell me why you proceeded not against this cruel love!

 

KING CLAUDIUS

O, for two special reasons;
First: The queen his mother
Lives almost by his looks.

And for myself,
She's so conjunctive to my life and soul,
That, as the star moves not but in his sphere,
I could not but by her.

The other motive,
Why to a public count I might not go,
Is the great love the general gender bear him.

 

LAERTES

And so have I a noble father lost;
A sister driven into desperate terms.

 

CLAUDIUS

You shortly shall hear more:
I loved your father, and we love ourself;
And that, I hope, will teach you to imagine—

 

ADAM

A missive!

 

CLAUDIUS

What noise is this?

 

ADAM

A letter, my lord, from Hamlet.

 

CLAUDIUS

From Hamlet! who brought it?

 

ADAM

Sailors, my lord, they say; I saw them not.

 

CLAUDIUS

Laertes, you shall hear it. Leave us.

 

‘High and mighty, You shall know I am set once more on
your kingdom.’ —How is this?

 

HAMLET

[Flashback narration] ‘Ere we were two days old at sea for England, a pirate of very warlike appointment gave us attack. We put on a compelled valour, and in the grapple I boarded them.
Amidst the battle, I alone became their prisoner.

They have dealt with me like thieves of mercy: but they knew what they
did; I am to do a good turn for them.

 

To-morrow shall I beg leave to see
your kingly eyes.

Post Script: I did look into the letter that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern bear.
For some reason my name was there writ; I replaced it with theirs.
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern hold their course for England, not suspecting what fate awaits them.’

 

GUILDENSTERN

Stop!

 

ROSENCRANTZ

Hamlet!

 

CLAUDIUS

You bastard, what meaning this?

There is no time.

Laertes, Will you be ruled by me?

 

LAERTES

So you will not o'errule me to a peace.

 

CLAUDIUS

To thine own peace.

Laertes, was your father dear to you?
Or are you like the painting of a sorrow,
A face without a heart?

 

LAERTES

Why ask you this?

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet comes back: what would you undertake?

 

LAERTES

To cut his throat i' the church.

 

CLAUDIUS

No place, indeed, should murder sanctuarize.

But, good Laertes, will you do this?

A match between Hamlet and thyself,—

You may choose
A sword unbated, and in a pass of practise
Requite him for your father.

 

LAERTES

I'll touch my point with contagion,

That, if I gall him slightly,
It may be death.

 

CLAUDIUS

Let's further think of this;

And that he calls for drink, I'll have prepared him
A chalice for the nonce, whereon but sipping,
If he by chance escape your venom'd stuck,
Our purpose may hold there.

[Enter Gertrude]

QUEEN GERTRUDE

One woe doth tread upon another's heel,
So fast they follow; your sister's drown'd, Laertes.

 

LAERTES

Drown'd! Ophelia?

 

GERTRUDE

In the glassy stream;
There with fantastic garlands did she come
There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke;
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide;
Mermaid-like

 

LAERTES

Then, Ophelia is—?

 

GERTRUDE

To muddy death!

 

LAERTES

Ophelia!

Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia,
And therefore I forbid my tears.
Let shame say what it will: when these are gone,
The woman will be out.

 

Scene 11 – A Watery Hell

 

CHORUS

Rosemary

Rosemary, fennel, columbine

Rue, buttercup

Nettle, daisy

 

There are many kinds of flowers

Shall I teach you? The meanings of the flowers?

 

Your pretty, purple orchids

Are “Dead-man’s Fingers”

 

Rosemary

Rosemary, fennel, columbine

Rue, buttercup

Nettle, daisy

 

Scene 12 – Grief

 

MOVA/MUNO/MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGERS)

A pick-axe, and a spade, a spade,

For and a shrouding sheet:

O, a pit of clay for to be made

For such a guest is meet.

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

Is she to be buried in Christian burial that
wilfully seeks her own salvation?

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)

The crowner hath sat on her, and finds it
Christian burial.

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

How can that be, unless she drowned herself in her
own defence?

 

MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGER)

Will you ha' the truth on't? If this had not been
a gentlewoman, she should have been buried out o'
Christian burial.

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

Why, there thou say'st: and the more pity that
great folk should have countenance in this world to
drown or hang themselves, more than their even
Christian.

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)

In youth, when I did love, did love,

 

MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGER)
Methought it was very sweet,

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)
To contract, O, the time, for, ah, my behove,

 

ALL
O, methought, there was nothing meet.

 

HAMLET

Have those fellows no feeling of their business, that they
sing at grave-making?

 

HORATIO

Custom hath made it in them a property of easiness.

 

HAMLET

Ah, Horatio,

Did these bones cost no more the breeding,
but to play at loggats with 'em? mine ache to think on't.

 

HAMLET

Whose grave's this?

 

MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGER)
Mine, sir.

 

HAMLET

I think it be thine, indeed; for thou liest in't.

 

MUGHAL (GRAVE-DIGGER)
You lie out on't, sir, and therefore it is not

yours.

 

HAMLET

What man dost thou dig it for?

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)

For no man, sir.

 

HAMLET

What woman, then?

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)

For none, neither.

 

HAMLET

Who is to be buried in't?

 

MUNO (GRAVE-DIGGER)

One that was a woman, sir; but, rest her soul, she's dead.

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

A noisy lot.

 

HAMLET

How long hast thou been a
grave-maker?

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

It was the very day that young Hamlet was born; he that
is mad, and sent into England.

 

HAMLET

Ay, marry, why was he sent into England?

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

Why, because he was mad: he shall recover his wits
there; or, if he do not, it's no great matter there.

 

HAMLET

Why?

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

'Twill, a not be seen in him there; there the men
are as mad as he.

 

HAMLET

How long will a man lie i' the earth ere he rot?

 

MOVA (GRAVE-DIGGER)

I' faith, if he be not rotten before he die

He will last you some eight year.

 

GRAVE-DIGGERS

But age, with his stealing steps,
Hath claw'd me in his clutch,
And hath shipped me intil the land,
As if I had never been such.

 

HAMLET

Prithee, Horatio,

Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this fashion i'
the earth?

 

HORATIO

E'en so.

 

HAMLET

To what base uses we may return, Horatio! Why may
not imagination trace the noble dust of Alexander,
till he find it stopping a bung-hole?

 

HORATIO

'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.

 

HAMLET

But soft! aside: here comes the funeral procession.

 

[Enter procession]

--That is the king!

 

The courtiers: who is this they follow?
And with such maimed rites? This doth betoken
The corse they follow did with desperate hand
Fordo its own life.

 

HAMLET

That is Laertes.

LAERTES

What ceremony else?

 

CHRISTOPHER

Her obsequies have been as far enlarged
As we have warranties.

And, but that the king o'ersways the order,
She should in ground unsanctified have lodged

Till the last trumpet.

 

LAERTES
A ministering angel shall my sister be,
When thou liest howling.

 

HAMLET

Sister? It cannot be—Ophelia?

 

MAID

Madam…

 

GERTRUDE

To the sweet: farewell!

I hoped thou shouldst have been my Hamlet's wife;
I thought thy bride-bed to have deck'd, sweet maid,
And not have strew'd thy grave.

 

LAERTES

O, treble woe
Fall ten times treble on that cursed head.
I catch her once more in mine arms.

 

HAMLET

What is he whose grief
Conjures the wandering stars, and makes them stand
Like wonder-wounded hearers?

 

LAERTES

You!

 

HAMLET

This is I,
Hamlet the Dane.

 

LAERTES

The devil take thy soul!

 

HAMLET

I prithee, take thy fingers from my throat;
For, though I am not splenitive and rash,
Yet have I something in me dangerous.
Hold off thy hand.

 

CLAUDIUS

Pluck them asunder.

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Hamlet!

 

HORATIO

Good my lord, be quiet.

 

HAMLET

Why I will fight with him upon this theme
Until my eyelids will no longer wag.

 

HAMLET

I loved Ophelia: forty thousand brothers
Could not, with all their quantity of love,
Make up my sum.

 

KING CLAUDIUS

O, he is mad, Laertes.

 

GERTRUDE

For love of God, forbear him.

 

HAMLET
What is the reason that you use me thus?
I loved you ever.

 

CLAUDIUS

Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech;
An hour of quiet shortly shall we see;
Till then, in patience our proceeding be.

 

[Exit all save Hamlet]

 

To Be Or Not To Be (Ballad)

HAMLET
Honest, beautiful soul
Spring fairy floating on the water's surface
The one I love is
the beautiful Ophelia

To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd.

To be, or not to be
To die, to sleep, to sleep, to sleep
And, perchance,
to dream!

 

[Enter Horatio and Celia]

 

HORATIO

My lord, are you well?

 

HAMLET
You do remember all the circumstance of my voyage?

 

HORATIO

Remember it, my lord?

A plot to rob thee of thy life.

Why, what a king is this!

 

HAMLET

Does it not, think'st thee, stand me now upon—
He that hath kill'd my king and whored my mother,
Thrown out his angle for my proper life,
Is't not perfect conscience,
To quit him with this arm?

 

CELIA

Poor prince….

 

HAMLET
But I am very sorry, good Horatio,
That to Laertes I forgot myself;
But, sure, the bravery of his grief did put me
Into a towering passion.

I would seek peace with him.

 

HORATIO

Someone comes!

 

[Enter the Ghost of Ophelia, and three other apparitions]

 

HAMLET

Ophelia….

 

OPHELIA (GHOST)

I shall impart a thing to you from his majesty.

 

HAMLET

Is’t a phantasm?

 

GHOSTS

Laertes, the card of gentry, full of most excellent
differences, of very soft society and great showing:

And with his weapon he's unfellowed.

 

HAMLET

Please, your mask—

 

OPHELIA (GHOST)

This is the easier.

 

GHOSTS

His majesty has laid a great wager on your head.

To say: On the outcome of passes between you and Laertes.

 

OPHELIA (GHOST)

It would come to immediate trial, if your lordship
would vouchsafe the answer.

 

HAMLET

How if I answer 'no'?

 

GHOSTS

Another fate.

 

HAMLET

I will answer: if it please his
majesty, 'tis the breathing time of day with me; let
the king hold his purpose, I will win for him an I can;
if not, I will gain nothing but my shame and the odd hits.

 

OPHELIA (GHOST)

I shall re-deliver you.

 

[Exit Ghosts]

 

HORATIO

You will lose this wager, my lord.

 

HAMLET

I do not think so: since he went into France, I
have been in continual practise.

But thou wouldst not think how ill all's here
about my heart: but it is no matter.

 

CELIA

My lord!

 

HORATIO

If your mind dislike any thing, obey it:

I will say you are not fit.

 

HAMLET

Not a whit, we defy augury:

Since no man has aught of what he
leaves, what is't to leave betimes?

 

[Enter Ghost]

 

GHOST

Hamlet.

 

HAMLET

Father.

 

GHOST

Go;

Take your fate in your hands.

 

HAMLET

I fear—

An unease which would go

Unremark’d in the fairer sex.

But I must go!

 

GHOST

Beloved son,

Go forth in all earnestness.

 

HAMLET

My lord!

 

 

Scene 13 – The Close

 

THE FATED MOMENT

 

CHORUS

The fated moment

The fated moment

 

Judgment gone astray

Where does it turn?

Only God knows

The final stop of fate

 

CLAUDIUS

My plans are flawless

With them, his life is-!

 

HORATIO

What is this uneasy presentiment?

This ominous sound that rings in my heart?

 

GERTRUDE

Even scorned, I cannot hate

You are my beloved son

 

LAERTES

Foolish tears have vanished

The flame of hate blazes

 

CHORUS

The fated moment

The fated moment

The fated moment

Now is the moment of fate

 

HAMLET

The only one I want

Is that dazzlingly beautiful soul

It's called Love! Love! Love!

 

HAMLET/CHORUS

Now is the moment of fate

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet, come, and take Laertes’ hand.

 

HAMLET

Give me your pardon, sir: I've done you wrong;

This presence knows,
How I am punish'd With sore distraction.

What I have done,
That might your nature, honour and exception
Roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness.

Pardon't, as you are a gentleman.

 

LAERTES

I am satisfied in nature,
But in my terms of honour
I stand aloof; and will no reconcilement,

To keep my name ungored. But till that time,
I do receive your offer'd love like love,
And will not wrong it.

 

HAMLET

My thanks.

 

CLAUDIUS

Give them the foils.

 

CHORUS

The fated moment

The fated moment

 

CLAUDIUS

Hamlet, you know the wager?

 

HAMLET

Very well, my lord.
Your grace hath laid the odds o' the weaker side.

 

LAERTES

This is too heavy, let me see another.

 

CLAUDIUS

I do not fear it; I have seen you both

You shall win.

 

HAMLET

This likes me well. These foils have all a length?

 

OSRIC

Ay, my good lord.

 

CLAUDIUS

If Hamlet give the first,
The king shall drink to Hamlet's better breath;

And in the cup an union shall he throw,
Richer than that which four successive kings
In Denmark's crown have worn.

 

Come, begin.

 

CHORUS

The fated moment

Now is the moment of fate

 

OSRIC

Come, begin!

 

HAMLET

One.

 

OSRIC

A hit, a very palpable hit.

 

LAERTES

Well; again.

 

CLAUDIUS

Stay; give me drink. Hamlet, this pearl is thine;
Here's to thy health.

 

Give him the cup.

 

HAMLET

I'll play this bout first; set it by awhile.

 

Come.

 

A hit; what say you?

 

LAERTES

A touch, a touch, I do confess.

 

CLAUDIUS

Our son shall win.

 

QUEEN GERTRUDE

He's scant of breath.
Here, Hamlet, let me wipe thy face.

 

HAMLET

Good madam!

 

LAERTES

My lord, I'll hit him now.

 

CLAUDIUS

I do not think't.

 

GERTRUDE

The queen carouses to thy fortune, Hamlet.

 

CLAUDIUS

Gertrude, do not drink.

 

GERTRUDE

I will, my lord; pardon me.

 

[Gertrude drinks]

 

CLAUDIUS

[Aside] It is too late!

 

HAMLET

Come, for the third, Laertes: you but dally;
I pray you, pass with your best violence;
I am afeard you make a wanton of me.

 

LAERTES

Say you so? come on.

 

OSRIC

Nothing, neither way.

 

LAERTES

Have at you now!

 

HAMLET

Stay!

 

CLAUDIUS

Part them; they are incensed.

 

HAMLET

Nay, come, again.

 

[Hamlet fatally stabs Laertes]

 

[Gertrude collapses]

 

MAID

The queen!

 

OSRIC

Look to the queen there, ho!

 

HORATIO

They bleed on both sides.

 

LAERTES

Why, as a woodcock to mine own springe,

I am justly kill'd.

 

HAMLET

How does the queen?

 

CLAUDIUS

She swounds to see them bleed.

 

GERTRUDE

No, no, the drink, the drink,--O my dear Hamlet,--
The drink, the drink! I am poison'd.

 

[Gertrude dies]

 

HAMLET

Mother? Mother!

O villany! Ho! let the door be lock'd:
Treachery! Seek it out.

Mother. Mother. Mother…

 

LAERTES

It is here, Hamlet: Hamlet, thou art slain;
No medicine in the world can do thee good;
The treacherous instrument,
Unbated and envenom'd: the foul practise
Hath turn'd itself on me lo, here I lie,
Never to rise again: thy mother's poison'd:
The king's to blame.

 

HAMLET

The point!--envenom'd too!
Then, venom, to thy work.

 

[Hamlet stabs Claudius]

 

CLAUDIUS

O, yet defend me, someone—

 

HAMLET

Here, thou incestuous, murderous, damned Dane,
Drink off this potion.

 

[Hamlet forces Claudius to drink the poison. Claudius dies.]

 

LAERTES
Exchange forgiveness with me, noble Hamlet:
Mine and my father's death come not upon thee,
Nor thine on me.

 

[Laertes dies]

 

HAMLET

Heaven make thee free of it! I follow thee.


I am dead, Horatio.

This fell sergeant, death,
Is strict in his arrest.


Horatio!

I am dead;
Thou livest; report me aright
To the unsatisfied.

 

HORATIO

Never believe it:
I am more an antique Roman than a Dane:
Here's yet some liquor left.

 

HAMLET

Fool! Art thou a man?
O good Horatio, what a wounded name,
Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me!
If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart
Stay in this harsh world,
To tell my story.

 

O, I die, Horatio;
The potent poison quite o'er-crows my spirit.

 

To be, or not to be;

To die, to sleep,
And, perchance,
to… dream!

 

Is this a dream? Ophelia!

‘Twere natural that I

Loved thee, fair Ophelia.

 

The rest is silence.

 

[Hamlet dies]

 

HORATIO

Now cracks a noble heart. Good night sweet prince:
And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!

 

Epilogue – Light

 

HORATIO

You gave up your life to carry out
justice through revenge
The staring role of your brief and beautiful life—
What did you think of it?


Beloved one,
What do you see now in the Land of the Dead?
As a spirit that seethes with boiling and burning emotion


The crimson sunrise stretches,
Advancing up the eastern face of the hills

Let's gather the principals of the legend
In order to praise your spirit


CHORUS
Legend of Hamlet! Legend of Hamlet!
Hamlet... Hamlet...

Hamlet... Hamlet...

 

First Curtain Call

 

KOSHINO

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for coming to this afternoon’s Moon Troupe special Tokyo performance, the final of “Hamlet!!” I am the kumichou, Koshino Ryū. Itsumine Aki, from Senka, honored us with her appearance in this show. All twenty-seven members gave everything they had, performing both the light and the shadow of their various roles, and were able to learn many things. And, receiving so much applause from the audience every day gave us so much power—thank you very much.

 

Here now, Ranno Hana will be transferring to Flower Troupe, so we’d like to entreat her for a few words. Ran.

 

RANNO

My four years spent in Moon Troupe have been a treasure to me. Everyone in Moon Troupe, and all fans of Moon Troupe, thank you for all that you have taught me. I will carefully collect together this mountain of treasures and set off for Flower Troupe. I will continue to try my hardest, so please continue to give me your support.

 

KOSHINO

Thank you. Well then, what you’ve all been waiting for—She loved Hamlet with all her heart, and gave an enthusiastic performance. Ryū Masaki will speak a few words. Masao.

 

RYŪ

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for coming to this afternoon’s Moon Troupe special Tokyo performance, the final of “Hamlet!!” I am Ryū Masaki. As the lyrics to one of the play’s songs state: “'Tis a consummation devoutly to be wish'd.” Now, in the moment where we have reached a con-consummation, I am deeply pleased and happy. And to everyone in the audience who has come time and again, and to all of the fans who give us so much warm encouragement—I’m full of gratitude. Truly, thank you for today.

 

Second Curtain Call

 

RYŪ

Yes, thank you. Ah, let me see…. I’m spacing a little right now. Wow… Yes… Yes… Um… Yes, ah, truly, thank you— Truly, thank you for today.

 

Third Curtain Call

 

RYŪ

Woo! Well then, I’ll take this moment to bring to your attention the band which always keeps us pumped up—!

 

Yes, and, yes, Ran-chan, this is your last performance with Moon Troupe, so how about one more word for us? Please.

 

RANNO

I’m really happy. I love Moon Troupe, so I’d like to jump with everyone here, in the end.

 

RYŪ

Jump? OK. Then… give a shout. Ranno Hana will give a shout… Oh, everyone!? … Looks like it’s everyone.

 

KOSHINO

Oh, we’re holding hands? The established Moon Troupe custom?

 

RYŪ

Yes. We’re jumping on “One, two?”

 

RANNO

Yes, on “one, two.”

 

RYŪ

All right. Well then, Ran-chan…

 

RANNO

Yes?

 

RYŪ

Keep trying your best, even in Flower Troupe, OK?

 

RANNO

OK.

 

RYŪ

OK!

 

RANNO

“One, two…”

 

ALL

Yay!

 

RYŪ

Yes. Yes.

 

Yes, thank you. Yes... My heart is full. Yes. In the next Grand Theater show, back together with everyone we’ll also be trying our best. Ladies and gentlemen, definitely please come and see us at the Grand Theater as well. Truly, thank you for today.

 

Fourth Curtain Call

 

RYŪ

Ah, wow. It’s Moon Troupe, huh?

 

Thank you. Truly, ladies and gentleman, thank you for coming to see us every day. Ah, my heart truly is full…. Yes. I can’t find the words, I apologize. But I think, in the end, it comes to this: I love you! Woo! Truly, thank you for today.